Okinawa Bases named after Medal of Honor Warriors


Albert Earnest Schwab

Camp Schwab: PFC Albert Earnest Schwab was a flame-thrower operator with Headquarters Company, 1st Battalion, 5th Marine Regiment. On May 7, 1945, while pinned down in a valley by machine-gun fire, he scaled a cliff and brazenly attacked the enemy gun with his flame thrower. As a result, his company was able to occupy the ridge. Suddenly, a second machine gun opened fire. Although he had not had time to replenish his supply of fuel, Pfc. Schwab advanced and succeeded in eliminating the gun before its final burst caught him in the left hip, inflicting fatal wounds.

The President of the United States takes pride in presenting the MEDAL OF HONOR posthumously to

PRIVATE FIRST CLASS ALBERT E. SCHWAB
UNITED STATES MARINE CORPS RESERVE

for service as set forth in the following CITATION:

For conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity at the risk of his life above and beyond the call of duty as a Flame Thrower Operator serving with Headquarters Company, First Battalion, Fifth Marines, First Marine Division, in action against enemy Japanese forces on Okinawa Shima on one of the Ryukyu Islands, May 7, 1945. Quick to take action when his company was pinned down in a valley and suffering resultant heavy casualties under blanketing machine-gun fire emanating from a high ridge to the front, Private First Class Schwab, unable to flank the enemy emplacement because of steep cliffs on either side, advanced up the face of the ridge in bold defiance of the intense barrage and, skillfully directing the fire of his flame thrower, quickly demolished the hostile gun position, thereby enabling his company to occupy the ridge. Suddenly a second Japanese machine gun opened fire, killing or wounding several Marines with its initial burst. Estimating with split-second decision the tactical difficulties confronting his comrades, Private First Class Schwab elected to continue his one-man assault despite a diminished supply of fuel for his flame thrower. Cool and indomitable, he moved forward in the face of the direct concentration of hostile fire, relentlessly closed the enemy position and attacked. Although severely wounded by a final vicious blast from the enemy weapon, Private First Class Schwab had succeeded in destroying two highly strategic Japanese gun positions during a critical stage of the operation and, by his dauntless, singlehanded efforts, materially furthered the advance of his company. His aggressive initiative, outstanding valor and professional skill throughout the bitter conflict sustained and enhanced the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service. He gallantly gave his life for his country.

/S/ HARRY S. TRUMAN
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William Adelbert Foster

Camp Foster: PFC William Adelbert Foster was a rifleman with 3rd Battalion, 1st Marine Regiment, 1st Marine Division. After assaulting a fortified Japanese position, he and another Marine engaged in a fierce hand grenade duel with enemy soldiers. An enemy grenade landed beyond reach of the Marines in the foxhole, so Foster dove on it, absorbing the explosion with his body. He lived long enough to hand his last two grenades to his fellow Marine, saying, "Make them count!"

The President of the United States takes pride in presenting the MEDAL OF HONOR posthumously to

PRIVATE FIRST CLASS WILLIAM A. FOSTER
UNITED STATES MARINE CORPS RESERVE

for service as set forth in the following CITATION:

For conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity at the risk of his life above and beyond the call of duty as a Rifleman with Company K, Third Battalion, First Marines, First Marine Division, in action against enemy Japanese forces on Okinawa Shima in the Ryukyu Chain, May 2, 1945. Dug in with another Marine on the point of the perimeter defense after waging a furious assault against a strongly fortified Japanese position, Private First Class Foster and comrade engaged in a fierce hand grenade duel with infiltrating enemy soldiers. Suddenly an enemy grenade landed beyond reach in the foxhole. Instantly diving on the deadly missile, Private First Class Foster absorbed the exploding charge in his own body, thereby protecting the other Marine from serious injury. Although mortally wounded as a result of his heroic action, he quickly rallied, handed his own remaining two grenades to his comrade and said, "Make them count." Stouthearted and indomitable, he had unhesitatingly relinquished his own chance of survival that his fellow Marine might carry on the relentless fight against a fanatic enemy, and his dauntless determination, cool decision and valiant spirit of self-sacrifice in the face of certain death reflect the highest credit upon Private First Class Foster and in the United States Naval Service. He gallantly gave his life in the service of his country.

/S/ HARRY S. TRUMAN
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Louis James Hague, Jr.

Camp Hague: Corporal, U.S. Marine Corps Reserve. Place and date: As leader of a machinegun squad serving with Company C, 1st Battalion, 1st Marines, 1st Marine Division, in action against enemy Japanese forces on Okinawa Shima in the Ryukyu Chain on 14 May 1945. Born: 12 December 1924, Ada, Minnesota.

The President of the United States takes pride in presenting the MEDAL OF HONOR posthumously to

CORPORAL LOUIS JAMES HAGUE, JR
UNITED STATES MARINE CORPS RESERVE

for service as set forth in the following CITATION:

Alert and aggressive during a determined assault against a strongly fortified Japanese hill position, Cpl. Hauge boldly took the initiative when his company's left flank was pinned down under a heavy machinegun and mortar barrage with resultant severe casualties and, quickly locating the two machineguns which were delivering the uninterrupted stream of enfilade fire, ordered his squad to maintain a covering barrage as he rushed across an exposed area toward the furiously blazing enemy weapons. Although painfully wounded as he charged the first machinegun, he launched a vigorous single-handed grenade attack, destroyed the entire hostile gun position and moved relentlessly forward toward the other emplacement despite his wounds and the increasingly heavy Japanese fire. Undaunted by the savage opposition, he again hurled his deadly grenades with unerring aim and succeeded in demolishing the second enemy gun before he fell under the slashing fury of Japanese sniper fire. By his ready grasp of the critical situation and his heroic 1-man assault tactics, Cpl. Hauge had eliminated two strategically placed enemy weapons, thereby releasing the besieged troops from an overwhelming volume of hostile fire and enabling his company to advance. His indomitable fighting spirit and decisive valor in the face of almost certain death reflect the highest credit upon Cpl. Hauge and the U.S. Naval Service. He gallantly gave his life in the service of his country.

/S/ HARRY S. TRUMAN
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Harold Gonsalves

Camp Gonsalves - Jungle Warfare Training Center (formerly Northern Training Area): PFC Harold Gonsalves, a scout sergeant with 4th Battalion, 15th Marine Regiment, 6th Marine Division, endured bombardment to help his forward observation team direct artillery fire during the assault at Mount Yaetake. When a Japanese grenade fell nearby, Gonsalves gave his life by diving on top of it.

The President of the United States takes pride in presenting the MEDAL OF HONOR posthumously to

PRIVATE FIRST CLASS HAROLD GONSALVES
UNITED STATES MARINE CORPS RESERVE

for service as set forth in the following CITATION:

For conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity at the risk of his life above and beyond the call of duty as Acting Scout Sergeant of a Forward Observer Team, serving with Battery L, Fourth Battalion, Fifteenth Marines, Sixth Marine Division, during action against enemy Japanese forces in Okinawa Shima in the Ryukyu Chain, 15 April 1945. Undaunted by the powerfully organized opposition encountered on Motobu Peninsula during a fierce assault waged by a Marine infantry battalion against a Japanese strong-hold, Private First Class Gonsalves repeatedly braved the terrific hostile bombardment to aid his Forward Observation Team in directing well-placed artillery fire and, when his commanding officer determined to move into the front lines in order to register a more effective bombardment in the enemy's defensive position, unhesitatingly advanced uphill with the officer and another Marine despite a slashing barrage of enemy mortar and rifle fire. As they reached the front, a Japanese grenade fell close within the group. Instantly Private First Class Gonsalves dived on the deadly missile, absorbing the exploding charge in his own body and thereby protecting the others from serious and perhaps fatal wounds. Stouthearted and indomitable, Private First Class Gonsalves readily yielded his own chances of survival that his fellow Marines might carry on the relentless battle against the fanatic Japanese and his cool decision, prompt action and valiant spirit of self-sacrifice in the face of certain death reflect the highest credit upon himself and the United States Naval Service. He gallantly gave his life in the service of his country.

/S/ HARRY S. TRUMAN
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Dale M. Hansen

Camp Hansen: Pvt. Dale M. Hansen was assigned to Company E, 2nd Battalion, 1st Marine Regiment, 1st Marine Division. During a critical stage of combat, he launched a one-man assault destroying enemy fighting holes. He reached a ridge crest and opened fire on six Japanese soldiers, killing four before his rifle jammed. Arming himself with another weapon and grenades, he advanced farther, destroying a mortar position and killing eight more of the enemy.

The President of the United States takes pride in presenting the MEDAL OF HONOR posthumously to

PRIVATE DALE M. HANSEN
UNITED STATES MARINE CORPS RESERVE

for service as set forth in the following CITATION:

For conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity at the risk of his life above and beyond the call of duty while serving with Company E, Second Battalion, First Marines, First Marine Division, in action against enemy Japanese forces on Okinawa Shima in the Ryukyu Chain, 7 May 1945. Cool and courageous in combat, Private Hansen unhesitatingly took the initiative during a critical stage of the action and, armed with a rocket launcher, crawled to an exposed position where he attacked and destroyed a strategically located hostile pillbox. With his weapon subsequently destroyed by enemy fire, he seized a rifle and continued his one-man assault. Reaching the crest of a ridge, he leaped across, opened fire on six Japanese and killed four before his rifle jammed. Attacked by the remaining two Japanese, he beat them off with the butt of his rifle and then climbed back to cover. Promptly returning with another weapon and a supply of grenades, he fearlessly advanced, destroyed a strong mortar position and annihilated eight more of the enemy. In the forefront of battle throughout this bitterly waged engagement, Private Hansen, by his indomitable determination, bold tactics and complete disregard of all personal danger, contributed essentially to the success of his company's mission and to the ultimate capture of this fiercely defended outpost of the Japanese Empire. His great personal valor in the face of extreme peril reflects the highest credit upon himself and the United States Naval Service.

/S/ HARRY S. TRUMAN
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Elbert L. Kinser

Camp Kinser: Sgt. Elbert L. Kinser led a rifle platoon with Company I, 3rd Battalion, 1st Marine Regiment, 1st Marine Division. While moving along a strategic ridge, Kinser engaged in a grenade battle after a sudden, close enemy attack. When a grenade landed nearby, Kinser threw himself onto the grenade to shield his men. He died in the explosion.

The President of the United States takes pride in presenting the MEDAL OF HONOR to

SERGEANT ELBERT L. KINSER
UNITED STATES MARINE CORPS RESERVE

for service as set forth in the following CITATION:

For conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity at the risk of his life above and beyond the call of duty while acting as Leader of a Rifle Platoon, serving with Company I, Third Battalion, First Marines, First Marine Division, in action against Japanese forces on Okinawa Shima in the Ryukyu Chain, May 4, 1945. Taken under sudden, close attack by hostile troops entrenched on the reverse slope while moving up a strategic ridge along which his platoon was holding newly won positions, Sergeant Kinser engaged the enemy in a fierce hand grenade battle. Quick to act when a Japanese grenade landed in the immediate vicinity, Sergeant Kinser unhesitatingly threw himself on the deadly missile, absorbing the full charge of the shattering explosion in his own body and thereby protecting his men from serious injury and possible death. Stouthearted and indomitable, he had yielded his own chance of survival that his comrades might live to carry on the relentless battle against a fanatic enemy. His courage, cool decision and valiant spirit of self-sacrifice in the face of certain death sustained and enhanced the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service. He gallantly gave his life for his country.

/S/ HARRY S. TRUMAN
Read more about SGT Kinser.


Fred F. Lester

US Naval Hospital Camp Lester: Petty Officer 1st Class Fred F. Lester was a US Navy Hospital Corpsman assigned to Assault Rifle Platoon, 1st Battalion, 22nd Marine Regiment, 6th Marine Division. Lester was treating a wounded Marine under a barrage of enemy machine guns, rifles and grenades when he was hit. He managed to pull the wounded man toward a covered position, but was hit a second time. Lester got the Marine to safety but was too seriously wounded to administer care. Realizing his wounds were fatal, Lester refused medical care while directing treatment for other wounded Marines. He died shortly after.

The President of the United States takes pride in presenting the MEDAL OF HONOR posthumously to

PETTY OFFICER FIRST CLASS FRED F. LESTER
UNITED STATES NAVY

for service as set forth in the following CITATION:

For conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity at the risk of his life above and beyond the call of duty while serving as a Medical Corpsman with an Assault Rifle Platoon, attached to the First Battalion, Twenty-second Marines, SIXTH Marine Division, during action against enemy Japanese forces on Okinawa Shima in the Ryukyu Chain, 8 June 1945. Quick to spot a wounded marine lying in an open field beyond the front lines following the relentless assault against a strategic Japanese hill position, LESTER unhesitatingly crawled toward the casualty under a concentrated barrage from hostile machineguns, rifles, and grenades. Torn by enemy rifle bullets as he inched forward, he stoically disregarded the mounting fury of Japanese fire and his own pain to pull the wounded man toward a covered position. Struck by enemy fire a second time before he reached cover, he exerted tremendous effort and succeeded in pulling his comrade to safety where, too seriously wounded himself to administer aid, he instructed 2 of his squad in proper medical treatment of the rescued marine. Realizing that his own wounds were fatal, he staunchly refused medical attention for himself and, gathering his fast-waning strength with calm determination, coolly and expertly directed his men in the treatment of 2 other wounded marines, succumbing shortly thereafter. Completely selfless in his concern for the welfare of his fighting comrades, Lester, by his indomitable spirit, outstanding valor, and competent direction of others, had saved the life of 1 who otherwise must have perished and had contributed to the safety of countless others. LESTER's fortitude in the face of certain death sustains and enhances the highest traditions of the U.S. Naval Service. He gallantly gave his life for his country.

/S/ HARRY S. TRUMAN
Read more about PO1 Lester.


Robert M. McTureous, Jr.

Camp McTureous: Pvt. Robert M. McTureous Jr. was with 3rd Battalion, 29th Marine Regiment, 6th Marine Division. He waged a one-man assault on the enemy when he noticed stretcher bearers under fire as they tried to evacuate wounded. His actions drew the heavy fire off the stretcher bearers and onto himself. After receiving serious wounds, McTureous crawled 200 yards to a sheltered position within friendly lines before calling for medical aid.

The President of the United States takes pride in presenting the MEDAL OF HONOR posthumously to

PRIVATE ROBERT M. MCTUREOUS, JR.
UNITED STATES MARINE CORPS

for service as set forth in the following CITATION:

For conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity at the risk of his life above and beyond the call of duty while serving with Company H, Third Battalion, Twenty-ninth Marines, Sixth Marine Division, in action against enemy Japanese forces on Okinawa in the Ryukyu Chain, June 7, 1945. Alert and ready for any hostile counteraction following his company's seizure of an important hill-objective Private McTureous was quick to observe the plight of company stretcher-bearers who were suddenly assailed by slashing machine-gun fire as they attempted to evacuate wounded at the rear of the nearby won position. Determined to prevent further casualties, he quickly filled his shirt with hand grenades and charged the enemy-occupied caves from which the concentrated barrage was emanating. Coolly disregarding all personal danger as he waged his furious one-man assault, he smashed grenades into the cave entrances, thereby diverting the heaviest fire from the stretcher-bearers to his own person and, resolutely returning to his own lines under a blanketing hail of rifle and Machine-gun fire to replenish his supply of grenades, dauntlessly continued his systematic reduction of Japanese strength until he himself sustained serious wounds after silencing a large number of the hostile guns. Aware of his own critical condition and unwilling to further endanger the lives of his comrades, he stoically crawled a distance of two hundred yards to a sheltered position within friendly lines before calling for aid. By his fearless initiative and bold tactics, Private McTureous had succeeded in neutralizing the enemy fire, killing six of the Japanese and effectively disorganizing the remainder of the savagely defending garrison. His outstanding valor and heroic spirit of self-sacrifice during a critical stage of operations reflect the highest credit upon himself and the United States Naval Service. He gallantly gave his life for his country.

/S/ HARRY S. TRUMAN
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Henry A. Courtney, Jr.

Camp Courtney: Maj. Henry A. Courtney Jr. was the executive officer of 2nd Battalion, 22nd Marine Regiment, 6th Marine Division. On May 14, 1945, he led a charge to seize a forward slope, taking out enemy gun positions along the way. When he reached the hilltop, Courtney encountered a large Japanese force. Attacking, he killed many and forced the remainder to retreat into caves. He was killed by a mortar burst while moving among his troops.

The President of the United States takes pride in presenting the MEDAL OF HONOR posthumously to

MAJOR HENRY A. COURTNEY, JR.
UNITED STATES MARINE CORPS RESERVE

for service as set forth in the following CITATION:

For conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity at the risk of his life above and beyond the call of duty as Executive Officer of the Second Battalion, Twenty-Second Marines, Sixth Marine Division, in action against enemy Japanese forces on Okinawa Shima in the Ryukyu Islands, 14 and 15 May 1945. Ordered to hold for the night in static defense behind Sugar Loaf Hill after leading the forward elements of his command in a prolonged fire fight, Major Courtney weighed the effect of a hostile night counterattack against the tactical value of an immediate Marine assault, resolved to initiate the assault, and promptly obtained permission to advance and seize the forward slope of the hill. Quickly explaining the situation to his small remaining force, he declared his personal intention of moving forward and then proceeded on his way, boldly blasting near-by cave positions and neutralizing enemy guns as he went. Inspired by his courage, every man followed without hesitation, and together the intrepid Marines braved a terrific concentration of Japanese gunfire to skirt the hill on the right and reach the reverse slope. Temporarily halting, Major Courtney sent guides to the rear for more ammunition and possible replacements. subsequently reinforced by twenty-six men and a LVT load of grenades, he determined to storm the crest of the hill and crush any planned counterattack before it could gain sufficient momentum to effect a break-through. Leading his men by example rather than by command, he pushed ahead with unrelenting aggressiveness, hurling grenades into cave openings on the slope with devastating effect. Upon reaching the crest and observing large numbers of Japanese forming for action less than one hundred yards away, he instantly attacked, waged a furious battle and succeeded in killing many of the enemy and in forcing the remainder to cover in the caves. Determined to hold, he ordered his men to dig in and, coolly disregarding the continuous hail of flying enemy shrapnel to rally his weary troops, tirelessly aided casualties and assigned his men to more advantageous positions. Although instantly killed by mortar burst while moving among his men, Major Courtney, by his astute military acumen, indomitable leadership and decisive action in the face of overwhelming odds, had contributed essentially to the success of the Okinawa Campaign and his great personal valor throughout sustained and enhanced the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service. He gallantly gave his life for his country.

/S/ HARRY S. TRUMAN
Read more about MAJ Courtney.


Smedley Darlington Butler

Although not a combatant during the Okinawa Campaign, MGen Butler was twice awarded the Medal of Honor. He retired from active duty in 1931 after having been passed over for the position of Commandant of the Marine Corps, despite being the ranking MGen in the Marine Corps after the death of Commandant (MGen) Wendell C. Neville in July, 1930.

First Award - Mexican Campaign
Rank and organization: Major, U.S. Marine Corps. Born: 30 July 1881, West Chester, Pa. Appointed from: Pennsylvania. G.O. No.: 177, 4 December 1915. Other Navy awards: Second Medal of Honor, Distinguished Service Medal.

Citation:
For distinguished conduct in battle, engagement of Vera Cruz, 22 April 1914. Maj. Butler was eminent and conspicuous in command of his battalion. He exhibited courage and skill in leading his men through the action of the 22d and in the final occupation of the city.


Second Award - Haitian Campaign
Rank and organization: Major, U.S. Marine Corps. Born: 30 July 1881, West Chester, Pa. Appointed from: Pennsylvania. Other Navy awards: Second Medal of Honor, Distinguished Service Medal.

Citation:
As Commanding Officer of detachments from the 5th, 13th, 23d Companies and the marine and sailor detachment from the U.S.S. Connecticut, Maj. Butler led the attack on Fort Riviere, Haiti, 17 November 1915. Following a concentrated drive, several different detachments of marines gradually closed in on the old French bastion fort in an effort to cut off all avenues of retreat for the Caco bandits. Reaching the fort on the southern side where there was a small opening in the wall, Maj. Butler gave the signal to attack and marines from the 15th Company poured through the breach, engaged the Cacos in hand-to-hand combat, took the bastion and crushed the Caco resistance. Throughout this perilous action, Maj. Butler was conspicuous for his bravery and forceful leadership.
Read more about MGen Butler.

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